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Complex Problem Solving

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  1. Day 1 : Problems
    3 Sessions
    |
    2 To Dos
  2. Day 2 : Helping tools
    2 Sessions
    |
    1 To Do
  3. Day 3 : Finding the right problem
    3 Sessions
  4. Day 4 : Prioritize
    3 Sessions
    |
    1 To Do
  5. Day 5 : Approaching problems
    3 Sessions
  6. Day 6 : Research
    3 Sessions
  7. Day 7 : Framing the problem
    2 Sessions
  8. Day 8 : Identifying root causes
    3 Sessions
  9. Day 9 : Categorizing your problem
  10. Day 10 : Problem Solving Styles
    4 Sessions
  11. Day 11 : Mid-course assimilation & feed back
  12. Day 12 : Assumptions and Constraints
    3 Sessions
  13. Day 13 : Assumptions explained with examples
    2 Sessions
    |
    1 To Do
  14. Day 14 : Using multiple perspectives
    4 Sessions
  15. Day 15 : Evaluating Solutions
    3 Sessions
  16. Day 16 : Evaluate risks
    2 Sessions
  17. Day 17: Presenting your solution
    3 Sessions
  18. Day 18 : Using criticism
    2 Sessions
  19. Day 19 : Implement the solution
    6 Sessions
  20. Day 20 : Problem solving mindset
    3 Sessions
  21. Day 21 : It's not the End, but a new Beginning
    1 Session
    |
    1 To Do
Lesson Progress
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Beginning at the end.

When a particular solution state is clearly defined, a problem can often be more easily solved by starting with the solution and working backwards toward the problem, filling in the necessary steps along the way.

The classic example is the problem:

Divide a triangle into three parts so that the parts can be put together to form a square. That’s very hard. But if you start from the solution end, with a square, it’s easy to divide it into three parts all of which form a triangle.

How do you count the number of people in a stadium that’s over ninety percent full? Count the number of empty seats and subtract from the number of seats in the stadium. Easier than counting people.

Start at the end, with the solution, envision how you want the relationship to be and work backwards toward a discovery of the problem.

Whenever the solution or goal state is clearer than the problem, then changing the entry point to the end may be the best approach. Start with the goal or solution and look for ways to work back to the problem.

For our example starting at the end could mean you envision how you want the team’s performance to improve or how you want the team to play in the upcoming match, this could give you the timeline needed to form a strategy.

We covered an important portion of our course today so now just sit back and relax and we’ll see you tomorrow!

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